J - General Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees

Candidates for baccalaureate degrees must fulfill the following requirements. (See the College of Graduate Studies section for the requirements for graduate degrees. See the College of Law section for the requirements for the degree of Juris Doctor.)

J-1. Credit Requirements

J-1-a

Students must have earned a minimum of 120 credits to be granted a baccalaureate degree from the University of Idaho. Some programs require a higher minimum. For the minimum number of credits required in each degree program, see the major curricula of the various degree-granting units in the individual departmental section.

J-1-b

A minimum of 40 credits in upper-division courses (numbered 300 or above) is required for a baccalaureate degree.

J-2. Residency Requirements

A student must earn a minimum of 30 upper-division credits in UI courses. No credits awarded for alternative credit opportunities (see regulation I) or independent study can be counted among these 30 UI credits. Study abroad and student exchange credits may be counted toward this requirement with prior approval by the student's academic department and dean.

J-3. General Education Curriculum and Learning Outcomes

First-year students (see Admissions Status) are to complete the University of Idaho General Education curriculum. A university education is a preparation both for living and for making a living. It offers an opportunity not only to lay the foundations of a career, but also to develop the mind to its highest potential, to cultivate the imagination as well as the power to reason, and to gain the intellectual curiosity that makes education a life-long enterprise. See the University Learning Outcomes for more information.

A student working toward a baccalaureate degree must complete the necessary course work in the seven categories described below (J-3-a through J-3-g). This requirement is to be satisfied by earning a total of 36 credits and meeting the minimum number of credits specified for each category. Within the J-3-e, J-3-f, J-3-g categories, students must complete a total of 18 credits. (Transfer students have two options for fulfilling this requirement; these are described under "General Education Requirements for Transfer Students" in the Undergraduate Admission section of this catalog). University of Idaho general education courses accepted as transferable as general education courses to other Idaho state-funded institutions are listed as General Education Matriculated - (GEM) courses in the General Catalog. Courses that fulfill requirements in each category are reviewed each year and the list is updated in the Spring. Students and advisors are encouraged to check the list when it is published in the Spring to be aware of any additional courses that have been added to meet specific requirements. Courses that are approved to satisfy a general education requirement can be used to satisfy those requirements even if the course is completed prior to being approved as a general education course.

Note: Remedial courses may not be used to satisfy any of this requirement. Degree-seeking students must be enrolled in ENGL 109, ENGL 101, or ENGL 102 in their first semester in residence and in each subsequent semester until they have passed ENGL 102. They must also be enrolled in MATH 108 or in a course that meets the general education requirement in mathematics, statistics, or computer science in their first year in residence and in each subsequent semester until the general education requirement in mathematics, statistics, or computer science has been satisfied.

J-3-a. Written Communication (3-6 cr, depending on placement)

The purpose of this requirement is to develop the ability to organize one's thoughts, to express them simply and clearly through oral, written and visual means, to observe the standards and conventions of language usage, and to suit tone to audience. The requirement is proficiency in written English equal to that needed for the completion of ENGL 102.

To fulfill this requirement, students must complete ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or attain satisfactory scores for both courses.  The following specific provisions apply to the English composition component:

  1. Based on placement, a student may be required to take up to 6 credits to satisfy this requirement. Students are provisionally placed in a required English composition course based on their SAT Verbal and/or ACT English scores. The University of Idaho offers an additional placement tool, the Write Class UIdaho: www.writeclassuidaho.com
  2. Students who attain a satisfactory score on the College Board English Achievement or Scholastic Aptitude (Verbal) Test or the American College Testing (ACT) English Test will be awarded credit and grades of P for ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.  Also, students who attain a score of 4 on the Advanced Placement Test in English will be awarded credit and a grade of P for ENGL 101 and students who attain a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement Test in English will be awarded credit and grades of P for ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.
  3. UI accepts credits earned in comparable writing courses taken at other accredited institutions.  (See credit limitation in J-5-d.)

J-3-b. Oral Communication (2-3 cr)

Students who receive a passing grade in one of the following four courses are expected to meet the proficiencies for Oral Communication courses contained in Section III-N of the Idaho State Board of Education Governing Policies and Procedures.  Students should be able to demonstrate basic competency in

  1. organization and preparation,
  2. oral language use and presentation, and
  3. addressing audience needs and interests.
COMM 101Fundamentals of Public Speaking2
ENGL 313Business Writing3
ENGL 317Technical Writing3
PHIL 102Reason and Rhetoric2

J-3-c. Scientific Ways of Knowing (8 cr , from two different disciplines, which include two accompanying labs OR 7 cr which includes a Core Science (CORS) course and one course with lab)

The purpose of this requirement is to develop a better understanding of the physical and biological world by learning some of the principles that explain the natural phenomena of the universe, the experimental method used to derive those principles, and their applications.

Study in this area is undertaken as part of the general education requirements in order to promote scientific literacy, that is, the ability to read and understand the science issues being debated in society. Scientific literacy is essential if citizens are to make informed judgments on the wide range of issues that affect their everyday lives. Students receiving passing grades in the natural and applied science courses of the general education curriculum will demonstrate competency in the following areas:

  1. knowledge of scientific principles;
  2. the ability to write clearly and concisely using the style appropriate to the sciences;
  3. the ability to interpret scientific data;
  4. the ability to analyze experimental design critically; and
  5. the development of laboratory skills.
BIOL 102
102L
Biology and Society
and Biology and Society Lab
4
BIOL 114Organisms and Environments4
BIOL 115
115L
Cells & the Evolution of Life
and Cells and the Evolution of Life Laboratory
4
BIOL 154
BIOL 155
Introductory Microbiology
and Introductory Microbiology Laboratory
4
BIOL 250
BIOL 255
General Microbiology
and General Microbiology Lab
5
CHEM 101
101L
Introduction to Chemistry
and Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory
4
CHEM 111
111L
Principles of Chemistry I
and Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CHEM 112
112L
Principles of Chemistry II
and Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
5
CORS 205-2973
ENVS 101
ENVS 102
Introduction to Environmental Science
and Field Activities in Environmental Sciences
4
EPPN 154
EPPN 155
Microbiology and the World Around Us
and Microbiology and the World Around Us: Laboratory
4
GEOG 100
100L
Physical Geography
and Physical Geography Lab
4
GEOL 101
101L
Physical Geology
and Physical Geology Lab
4
GEOL 102
102L
Historical Geology
and Historical Geology Lab
4
PHYS 100
100L
Fundamentals of Physics
and Fundamentals of Physics Lab
4
PHYS 103
PHYS 104
General Astronomy
and Astronomy Lab
4
PHYS 111
111L
General Physics I
and General Physics I Lab
4
PHYS 112
112L
General Physics II
and General Physics II Lab
4
PHYS 211
211L
Engineering Physics I
and Laboratory Physics I
4
PHYS 212
212L
Engineering Physics II
and Laboratory Physics II
4
SOIL 205
SOIL 206
The Soil Ecosystem
and The Soil Ecosystem Lab
4

J-3-d. Mathematical Ways of Knowing (3 cr)

These courses develop analytical, quantitative, and problem solving skills by involving students in doing mathematics, statistics, or computer science and by focusing on understanding the concepts of these disciplines.

Students receiving passing grades in mathematics, statistics, or computer science will have the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems.

CS 112Computational Thinking and Problem Solving3
MATH 123Mathematics Applied to the Modern World3
MATH 130Finite Mathematics3
MATH 137Algebra with Applications3
MATH 143Pre-calculus Algebra and Analytic Geometry3
MATH 160Survey of Calculus4
MATH 170Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
MATH 175Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
MATH 275Analytic Geometry and Calculus III3
STAT 251Statistical Methods3

J-3-e. Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing (6 cr, from two different disciplines) and Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing (6 cr, from two different disciplines)

The purpose of these liberal arts courses is to provide students with critical tools for understanding the human experience and providing the means for students to respond to the world around them.

Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing courses enable students to reflect upon their lives and ask fundamental questions of value, purpose, and meaning in a rigorous and systematic interpretative manner, with the goal of fostering understanding of culture and inspiring a citizenry that is more literate, respectful of diverse viewpoints, and intellectually inquisitive.

Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing courses enable students to apply rigorous analytic skills for the purpose of explaining the dynamic interaction among history, institutions, society and ideas that shape the behaviors of individuals, communities and societies. With these skills students can critically address the social issues of our contemporary world.

Courses on the humanities and social science lists that are also listed as satisfying the American diversity or international requirement are indicated by a D or I designation.

Approved Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing Courses:

AMST 301Studies in American Culture3
ARCH 151Introduction to the Built Environment3
ART 100World Art and Culture3
ART 205Visual Culture3
ART 213History and Theory of Modern Design3
ART 302Modern Art and Theory3
ART 382History of Photography3
ART 407New Media3
DAN 100Dance in Society3
ENGL 175Introduction to Literary Genres3
ENGL 221History of Film 1895-19453
ENGL 222History of Film 1945-Present3
ENGL 257Literature of Western Civilization3
ENGL 258Literature of Western Civilization3
ENGL 322Environmental Literature and Culture3
ENGL 341Survey of British Literature3
ENGL 342Survey of British Literature3
ENGL 343Survey of American Literature3
ENGL 344Survey of American Literature3
ENGL 345Shakespeare3
ENGL 375The Bible as Literature3
FLEN 210Introduction to Classic Mythology3
FLEN 313French/Francophone Literature in Translation3
FLEN 324Topics in German Literature in Translation3
FLEN 331Japanese Anime3
FLEN 391Hispanic Film3
FLEN 394Latin American Literature in Translation3
HIST 340Modern India, 1757-19473
HIST 350The Age of Enlightenment: European Culture & Ideas, 1680-18003
HIST 357Women in Pre-Modern European History3
HIST 366Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History, 1880-19803
HIST 378History of Science I: Antiquity to 17003
HIST 379History of Science II: 1700-Present3
HIST 414History and Film3
HIST 442The Medieval Church: Europe in the Early and High Middle Ages3
HIST 443The Medieval State: Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages3
HIST 445Medieval English Constitutional and Legal History: 1066-14853
HIST 447The Renaissance3
HIST 448The Reformation3
HIST 485Chinese Social and Cultural History3
IS 370African Community, Culture, and Music1-3
MUSH 101Survey of Music3
MUSH 111Introduction to Music Literature3
MUSH 201History of Rock and Roll3
PHIL 103Ethics3
PHIL 200Philosophy of Alcohol3
PHIL 201Critical Thinking3
PHIL 208Business Ethics3
PHIL 240Belief and Reality3
PHIL 351Philosophy of Science3
PHIL 361Professional Ethics3
THE 101Introduction to the Theatre3
THE 468Theatre History3
WGSS 201Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies3

Approved Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing Courses:

ANTH 100Introduction to Anthropology3
ANTH 220Peoples of the World3
ANTH 261Language and Culture3
ANTH 329North American Indians3
ANTH 350Food, Culture, and Society3
ANTH 462Human Issues in International Development3
COMM 233Interpersonal Communication3
COMM 335Intercultural Communication3
COMM 410Conflict Management3
ECON 201Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON 202Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 272Foundations of Economic Analysis4
EDCI 301Lrng, Dvlpmnt, & Assessment3
FLEN 270Introduction to Greek and Roman Civilization3
FLEN 307Institutions of the European Union3
FLEN 308European Immigration and Integration3
GEOG 165Human Geography3
GEOG 200World Regional Geography3
GEOG 365Political Geography3
HIST 101History of Civilization 13
HIST 102History of Civilization 23
HIST 111Introduction to U.S. History3
HIST 112Introduction to U.S. History3
HIST 180Introduction to East Asian History3
HIST 270Introduction to Greek and Roman Civilization3
HIST 315Comparative African-American Cultures3
HIST 462History of the American West3
HIST 461Idaho and the Pacific Northwest3
HIST 380Disease and Culture:History of Western Medicine3
HIST 382History of Biology: Conflicts and Controversies3
HIST 388History of Mathematics3
HIST 412Revolutionary North America and Early National Period3
HIST 419Topics in the American West3
HIST 420History of Women in American Society3
HIST 424American Environmental History3
HIST 426Red Earth White Lies: American Indian History 1840-Present3
HIST 430U.S. Diplomatic History3
HIST 431Stolen Continents, The Indian Story: Indian History to 18403
HIST 438Modern Mexico and the Americas3
HIST 439Modern Latin America3
HIST 440Social Revolution in Latin America3
HIST 441Slavery and Freedom in the Americas3
HIST 449Tudor-Stuart Britian 1485-16603
HIST 452Europe in the Age of the Revolution, 1770-18803
HIST 456Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust3
HIST 457History of the Middle East3
HIST 460Conspiracies and Secret Societies in History3
HIST 466Eastern Europe Since 17743
HIST 467Russia to 18943
HIST 468Russia and Soviet Union Since 18943
HIST 482Japan, 1600 to Present3
HIST 484Modern China, 1840s to Present3
IS 325The Contemporary Muslim World3
IS 326Africa Today3
IS 350Sports and International Affairs3
NRS 125Introduction to Conservation and Natural Resources3
POLS 101Introduction to Political Science and American Government3
POLS 205Introduction to Comparative Politics3
POLS 237Introduction to International Politics3
POLS 275American State and Local Government3
POLS 331American Political Parties and Elections3
POLS 332American Congress3
POLS 333American Political Culture3
POLS 338American Foreign Policy3
POLS 381European Politics3
PSYC 101Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 130Introduction to Criminology3
SOC 230Social Problems3
SOC 301Introduction to Diversity and Stratification3
SOC 336Comparative Criminal Justice Systems3
SOC 340Social Change & Globalization3
SOC 343Power, Politics, and Society3
SOC 423Economic (In)Justice in the United States3
SOC 424Sociology of Gender3
SOC 427Racial and Ethnic Relations3
SOC 431Personal and Social Issues in Aging3
SOC 439Inequalities in the Justice System3
SOC 450Dynamics of Social Protest3

Within the J-3-e, J-3-f, J-3-g categories, students must complete a total of 18 credits.

J-3-f. American Diversity (One course) and International (One course or an approved study abroad experience)

As we live in an increasingly diverse and multicultural world, the purpose of these courses is to prepare students to understand, communicate and collaborate with those from diverse communities within the United States and throughout the world.

The American diversity courses seek to increase awareness of contemporary and historical issues surrounding the social and cultural diversity in the U.S. Students engage in critical thinking and inquiry into the issues, complexities, and implications of diversity, and how social, economic, and/or political forces have shaped American communities. Diversity includes such characteristics as ability, age, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status.

One course chosen from the approved American diversity courses listed below. If a student takes a General Education course in another category that also appears on the list of approved American diversity courses, then this requirement is considered to be completed.

The international courses seek to develop an understanding of international values, belief systems and social issues that have contributed to current balances of power and cultural relations. Students develop an understanding of the roles that the United States and other countries have played in global relations and the ways cultures have interacted and influenced each other.

One course chosen from the approved international courses listed below. If a student takes a General Education course in another category that also appears on the list of approved International courses, then this requirement is considered to be completed. The international requirement may be waived if a student successfully completes an approved Summer, Fall, or Spring term abroad through the International Programs Office.

Approved American Diversity Courses:

AIST 320Native American & Indigenous Film3
AIST 401Contemporary American Indian Issues3
AIST 422Plateau Indians3
AIST 484American Indian Literature3
AMST 301Studies in American Culture3
ANTH 329North American Indians3
ANTH 350Food, Culture, and Society3
ARCH 411Native American Architecture3
COMM 432Gender and Communication3
COMM 491Communication and Aging3
CORS 232Science on Your Plate: Food Safety, Risks and Technology3
EDCI 302Teaching Culturally Diverse Learners4
ENGL 380Introduction to U.S. Ethnic Literatures3
HIST 111Introduction to U.S. History3
HIST 112Introduction to U.S. History3
HIST 315Comparative African-American Cultures3
HIST 461Idaho and the Pacific Northwest3
HIST 462History of the American West3
HIST 412Revolutionary North America and Early National Period3
HIST 414History and Film3
HIST 419Topics in the American West3
HIST 420History of Women in American Society3
HIST 424American Environmental History3
HIST 426Red Earth White Lies: American Indian History 1840-Present3
HIST 431Stolen Continents, The Indian Story: Indian History to 18403
ID 443Universal Design3
JAMM 340Cultural Diversity and the Media3
JAMM 445History of Mass Media3
MUSH 410Studies in Jazz History3
POLS 101Introduction to Political Science and American Government3
POLS 333American Political Culture3
POLS 468Civil Liberties3
PSYC 315Psychology of Women3
PSYC 419Adult Development and Aging3
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 230Social Problems3
SOC 301Introduction to Diversity and Stratification3
SOC 423Economic (In)Justice in the United States3
SOC 424Sociology of Gender3
SOC 427Racial and Ethnic Relations3
SOC 431Personal and Social Issues in Aging3
SOC 439Inequalities in the Justice System3
SOC 450Dynamics of Social Protest3
SPAN 306Culture and Institutions of Latin America3
SPAN 413Spanish American Short Fiction3
WGSS 201Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies3

Approved International Courses:

AGEC 481Agricultural Markets in a Global Economy3
AGED 406Exploring International Agriculture3
ANTH 220Peoples of the World3
ANTH 261Language and Culture3
ANTH 462Human Issues in International Development3
ART 100World Art and Culture3
ART 213History and Theory of Modern Design3
ART 302Modern Art and Theory3
ART 303Contemporary Art and Theory3
ART 313History and Theory of Modern Design3
CHIN 110Elementary Chinese I4
CHIN 112Elementary Chinese II4
CHIN 210Intermediate Chinese I4
CHIN 212Intermediate Chinese II4
COMM 335Intercultural Communication3
ECON 446International Economics3
ECON 447International Development Economics3
ENGL 221History of Film 1895-19453
ENGL 222History of Film 1945-Present3
ENVS 225International Environmental Issues Seminar3
FCS 411Global Nutrition3
FCS 419Dress and Culture3
FLEN 307Institutions of the European Union3
FLEN 308European Immigration and Integration3
FLEN 313French/Francophone Literature in Translation3
FLEN 315French/Francophone Cinema in Translation3
FLEN 324Topics in German Literature in Translation3
FLEN 331Japanese Anime3
FLEN 391Hispanic Film3
FLEN 394Latin American Literature in Translation3
FREN 101Elementary French I4
FREN 102Elementary French II4
FREN 201Intermediate French I4
FREN 202Intermediate French II4
FREN 301Advanced French Grammar3
FREN 302Advanced French Writing Skills3
FREN 304Connecting French Language and Culture3
FREN 307French Phonetics3
FREN 308Advanced French Conversation3
FREN 407French & Francophone Literatures3
FREN 408French and Francophone Culture and Institutions3
FREN 410French and Francophone Arts3
GEOG 165Human Geography3
GEOG 200World Regional Geography3
GEOG 350Geography of Development3-4
GEOG 360Population Dynamics and Distribution3-4
GEOG 365Political Geography3
GERM 101Elementary German I4
GERM 102Elementary German II4
GERM 201Intermediate German I4
GERM 202Intermediate German II4
GERM 301German Reading and Writing3
GERM 302German Listening and Speaking3
GERM 420Topics in German Culture & Literature - Themes3
GERM 440German Media3
HIST 101History of Civilization 13
HIST 102History of Civilization 23
HIST 180Introduction to East Asian History3
HIST 270Introduction to Greek and Roman Civilization3
HIST 315Comparative African-American Cultures3
HIST 340Modern India, 1757-19473
HIST 350The Age of Enlightenment: European Culture & Ideas, 1680-18003
HIST 357Women in Pre-Modern European History3
HIST 366Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History, 1880-19803
HIST 371History of England3
HIST 372History of England3
HIST 378History of Science I: Antiquity to 17003
HIST 379History of Science II: 1700-Present3
HIST 380Disease and Culture:History of Western Medicine3
HIST 382History of Biology: Conflicts and Controversies3
HIST 388History of Mathematics3
HIST 414History and Film3
HIST 430U.S. Diplomatic History3
HIST 438Modern Mexico and the Americas3
HIST 439Modern Latin America3
HIST 440Social Revolution in Latin America3
HIST 441Slavery and Freedom in the Americas3
HIST 442The Medieval Church: Europe in the Early and High Middle Ages3
HIST 443The Medieval State: Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages3
HIST 445Medieval English Constitutional and Legal History: 1066-14853
HIST 447The Renaissance3
HIST 448The Reformation3
HIST 449Tudor-Stuart Britian 1485-16603
HIST 452Europe in the Age of the Revolution, 1770-18803
HIST 456Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust3
HIST 457History of the Middle East3
HIST 460Conspiracies and Secret Societies in History3
HIST 466Eastern Europe Since 17743
HIST 467Russia to 18943
HIST 468Russia and Soviet Union Since 18943
HIST 482Japan, 1600 to Present3
HIST 484Modern China, 1840s to Present3
HIST 485Chinese Social and Cultural History3
ID 281History of the Interior I3
ID 282History of the Interior II3
IS 325The Contemporary Muslim World3
IS 326Africa Today3
IS 350Sports and International Affairs3
IS 370African Community, Culture, and Music1-3
JAMM 490Global Media3
JAPN 101Elementary Japanese I4
JAPN 102Elementary Japanese II4
JAPN 201Intermediate Japanese I4
JAPN 202Intermediate Japanese II4
JAPN 301Japanese Reading3
JAPN 303Japanese Speaking3
LARC 390Italian Hill Towns and Urban Centers3
LAS 409Modern Latin American Society3
LAS 422Mexican Culture through Cinema3
MUSH 420Studies in World Music3
PHIL 367Global Justice3
POLS 205Introduction to Comparative Politics3
POLS 237Introduction to International Politics3
POLS 338American Foreign Policy3
POLS 381European Politics3
POLS 385Political Psychology3
POLS 420Introduction to Asian Politics3
POLS 441Genes and Justice: Comparative Biotechnology Policy Formation3
POLS 449World Politics and War3
POLS 480Politics of Development3
POLS 487Political Violence and Revolution3
SOC 336Comparative Criminal Justice Systems3
SOC 340Social Change & Globalization3
SOC 343Power, Politics, and Society3
SPAN 101Elementary Spanish I4
SPAN 102Elementary Spanish II4
SPAN 104Elementary Spanish Transition4
SPAN 201Intermediate Spanish I4
SPAN 202Intermediate Spanish II4
SPAN 301Advanced Grammar3
SPAN 302Advanced Composition3
SPAN 303Spanish Conversation3
SPAN 305Culture and Institutions of Spain3
SPAN 306Culture and Institutions of Latin America3
SPAN 308Proficiency in Reading3
SPAN 310Spanish for the Professions I3
SPAN 401Readings: Spanish Literature3
SPAN 402Readings: Spanish American Literature3
SPAN 409Modern Latin American Society3
SPAN 412Spanish Short Fiction3
SPAN 413Spanish American Short Fiction3
SPAN 419Latin America Theatre Through Literature3
SPAN 420Modern Spanish Theatre Through Literature3
SPAN 421Bilingual and Bicultural Literature3
SPAN 422Mexican Culture through Cinema3
SPAN 423Gender and Identity in Spanish Cinema3
THE 468Theatre History3

Within the J-3-e, J-3-f, J-3-g categories, students must complete a total of 18 credits.

J-3-g. Integrated Studies - ISEM 101 (3 cr ), ISEM 301 Great Issues Seminar(1 cr ), and Senior Experience

The purpose of these courses is to provide students with the tools of integrative thinking, which are critical for problem solving, creativity and innovation, and communication and collaboration. Integrated learning is the competency to attain, use, and develop knowledge from a variety of disciplines and perspectives, such as the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences, with disciplinary specialization (to think divergently, distinguishing different perspectives), and to incorporate information across disciplines and perspectives (to think convergently, re-connecting diverse perspectives in novel ways). It is a cumulative learning competency, initiated as a first-year student and culminating as reflected in a graduating senior.

One course from ISEM 101 (open to first-year students only). One credit of ISEM 301. One course chosen from the approved Senior Experience courses listed below.

Approved Senior Experience Courses:

AGEC 478Advanced Agribusiness Management3
AGED 471Senior Capstone in Agricultural Education1
AGED 498Internship (Max 10 credits)1-10
ARCH 454Architectural Design: Vertical Studio6
ART 410Professional Practices2
ART 490BFA Art/Design Studio6
ART 491Information Design3
ART 495BFA Senior Thesis2
AVS 450Issues in Animal Agriculture2
BE 478Engineering Design I3
BE 479Engineering Design II3
BE 491Senior Seminar1
BIOL 401Undergraduate Research1-4
BIOL 405Practicum in Anatomy Laboratory Teaching2-4
BIOL 407Practicum in Biology Laboratory Teaching2-6
BIOL 408Practicum in Human Physiology Laboratory Teaching2-4
BIOL 411Senior Capstone2
BIOL 491Practicum in Teaching2
BUS 490Strategic Management3
CE 494Senior Design Project3
CHE 452Environmental Management and Design1-16
CHE 454Process Analysis and Design II3
CHEM 409Proseminar1
CS 481CS Senior Capstone Design II3
ECE 481EE Senior Design II3
ECE 483Computer Engineering Senior Design II3
ECON 490Economic Theory and Policy3
ENGL 440Client-Based Writing3
ENGL 490Senior Seminar3
EDCI 401Internship Seminar1
EDCI 485Secondary Internship15
ENT 438Pesticides in the Environment3
ENVS 497Senior Research2-4
FCS 401Professional Ethics and Practice in CFCS1
FCS 424Apparel Product Line Development: Senior Capstone4
FCS 432Apparel Promotion and Merchandising3
FCS 486Nutrition in the Life Cycle3
FCS 497Internship Preschool1-16
FISH 418Fisheries Management4
FISH 473ECB Senior Presentation1
FISH 495Fisheries Seminar1
FL 401MLC International Experience1
FOR 424Silviculture Principles and Practices4
FOR 427Prescribed Burning Lab3
FOR 473ECB Senior Presentation1
FS 489Food Product Development3
GEOG 493Senior Capstone in Geography3
GEOL 490Geology Field Camp3
HIST 401Seminar1-16
ID 452Interior Design VI6
INDT 484Industrial Technology Capstone I3
INTR 401Career and Leadership Development2
IS 495International Studies Senior Seminar3
JAMM 448Law of Mass Media3
LARC 480The Resilient Landscape3
MATH 415Cryptography3
ME 424Mechanical Systems Design I3
ME 426Mechanical Systems Design II3
MUSA 490Half Recital0
MUSA 491Recital0
MUSC 481Senior Thesis in Music Theory II1
MUSC 490Senior Recital0
MUSH 481Senior Thesis in Music History II1
MUST 432Practicum: Music Teaching11
MVSC 486Healthy Active Lifestyle Assessment and Intervention3
NRS 473ECB Senior Presentation1
NRS 475Conservation Planning and Management4
ORGS 410Capstone Project in Organizational Sciences1-6
PEP 498Internship in Exercise Science & Health1-16
PHIL 490Senior Seminar3
PHYS 407Communicating Science1
PHYS 492Senior Research1
POLS 490Senior Experience3
PSYC 415History and Systems of Psychology3
REC 498Internship in Recreation, Sport, and Tourism1-16
REM 456Integrated Rangeland Management3
REM 473ECB Senior Presentation1
RMAT 473ECB Senior Presentation1
RMAT/MKTG 495Product Development and Brand Management3
SOC 460Capstone: Sociology in Action3
SOC 461Capstone:Justice Policy Issues3
SOC 462Senior Practicum3
SOC 464Criminology Abroad3
THE 483Senior Capstone Project1
VTD 457Capstone Design Studio I6
WLF 473ECB Senior Presentation1
WLF 492Wildlife Management4
Within the J-3-e, J-3-f, J-3-g categories, students must complete a total of 18 credits.

J-4. Grade Requirements

To qualify for the baccalaureate degree, a candidate must have a UI grade-point average of 2.00 or better. See exceptions under E-4 and E-5.

J-5. Credit Limitations

A candidate may count toward a baccalaureate degree no more than:

J-5-a

Thirty credits earned in alternative credit opportunities (see regulation I).

J-5-b

Twelve credits earned under the pass-fail option (see regulation B-11).

J-5-c

Zero credits in remedial-level courses.

J-6. Assignment of Curricular Requirements (Catalog Issue)

In addition to fulfilling the general university requirements for degrees, candidates for baccalaureate degrees must satisfy the particular requirements specified for their curricula. The pertinent requirements are those contained in the most recent UI catalog issue that was in effect at the time of, or subsequent to, the candidate's initial enrollment as a degree-seeking student at UI. The earliest catalog issue available to students re-admitted as a degree-seeking student at the UI, is the most recent catalog at the time of re-enrollment. A catalog issue is valid for a maximum of seven years from its effective date. The effective date of a catalog issue is the first Monday following spring graduation.

J-7. Concurrent and Subsequent Baccalaureate Degrees.

J-7-a. Concurrent Degrees.

A student may concurrently pursue degrees in one or more colleges.  For exceptions to this rule, see general studies in part 4.  In addition to the university requirements students must fulfill the departmental and college requirements for all degrees. 

J-7-b. Subsequent Degrees.

Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree and who wish to complete the requirements for a subsequent degree must earn at least 15 credits as an undergraduate student after completion of the previous baccalaureate degree.  And fulfill the university, departmental and college requirements for the second degree. For exceptions to this regulation, see general studies in part 4.

J-8. Degree with Double Major.

Students may complete two different majors (curricula) offered under a particular baccalaureate degree and have both majors shown on their academic records and diplomas, e.g., Bachelor of Arts with majors in history and political science. In addition to the university requirements students must fulfill the departmental and college requirements for all majors.  Each of the majors must lead to the same degree. When majors leading to different degrees are involved, see the requirements applicable to the awarding of a concurrent baccalaureate degree (J-7-a).

J-9. Academic Minors

J-9-a

An academic minor is a prescribed course of study consisting of 18 or more credits which supplements an undergraduate major at the University of Idaho. For descriptions of minor curricula, see the programs of the degree-granting units in the individual departmental section. In the following paragraphs of J-9, "minor" denotes "academic minor," which is to be distinguished from "teaching minor"; for information on the latter, see the Department of Curriculum and Instruction section.

J-9-b

A student may pursue one or more minors in addition to a major by filing with the registrar a declaration of intention to do so. Completion of a minor is required only if specified by the degree-granting unit, but any minor completed is recorded on the student's academic record.

J-9-c

Transfer credits may be applied to a minor , however, at least 9 credits of those completing the minor’s requirements must be in UI courses. Similar to the residency requirements for a baccalaureate degree in J-2, no credits awarded for independent study, bypassed courses (see I-2-d), credit by examination (see I-1-a, I-1-c, or I-2-a), College Level Examination Program (CLEP – see I-2-b), or experiential learning (see I-2-b) can be counted among these 9 UI credits. Study abroad and student exchange credits may be counted toward this requirement with prior approval by the student’s academic department and dean.

J-9-d

A student may complete an undergraduate minor even though he or she has already earned a baccalaureate degree at the University of Idaho. If the sole objective is to complete an undergraduate minor, the student should declare a “Minor-Only” curriculum in the department offering the minor. Students who declare a minor-only curriculum are not eligible for financial aid funds (see the Student Financial Aid Services section).